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July 16, 2014

TV Production Jumps Nearly 34% in L.A. in Q2

The second quarter of 2014 saw a 33.7% gain over last year across the region, due in part to new summer programming.

Juliana J. Bolden
  • Chart courtesy of FilmLA

Television production in the Los Angeles area enjoyed a big increase during the second quarter of 2014—a 33.7% jump from 2013 Q2, according to figures released today by regional nonprofit FilmL.A. Inc., which administers film permits across the county.

The uptick is driven in part seemingly by production scheduling shifts and by the industry opting for more new summer programming, instead of the season’s long-established re-runs.

Q2 yielded 5,761 production days this year, versus 4,310 days during the April 1 through June 30 period in 2013.

Good news, particularly following a weak first quarter, which saw 4,624 production days in January through March—down more than 9% from last year's 5,091 days.

The report defines one production day as a "single crew’s permission to film a single project at a single defined location during any given 24-hour" time frame. This report does not include production that occurs on "certified sound stages" or "on-location in jurisdictions not served by FilmL.A.," according to the agency.

Dramas, sitcoms, reality shows, pilots and web-based programs all saw boosts, as illustrated in the genre breakdown chart above.

See complete details, including data covering theatrical feature film production, here at FilmLA.com.


Photo Credit: Invision/AP   

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