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Albert Freedman

Producer

Albert Freedman on the head of Geritol (Twenty-One's sponsor) wanting Herbert Stempel off the program and how Freedman convinced Charles Van Doren to become a contestant

07:41

If the information had not come out, the American people would have gone on with their merry lives. They would have had entertainment, then it would have gone on to some other form of entertainment on television. What really took place, was that live television essentially stopped with my demise and the demise of my show. Television then went into the area of filmed product.

About this interview

In his nearly four-hour Archive interview, Albert Freedman talks about his early days as a writer and producer for radio, on such audience participation shows as Earn Your Vacation and A Dollar A Minute. He discusses his transition to TV, writing for The Pinky Lee Show and You Bet Your Life. He describes his early association with Jack Barry and Dan Enright when he produced the quiz shows Juvenile Jury and Life Begins at Eighty in the mid-1950s. Recalling his work as a producer on Tic Tac Dough and Twenty-One, Freedman also shares his memories of his testimonies before the grand jury hearings in New York and the later Harris subcommittee in Washington D.C., when Twenty-One became the center of controversy during the Quiz Show Scandals. He also elaborates on his dealings with Charles Van Doren, the star witness of the Washington hearings, whom he initially booked on Twenty-One.  Freedman speaks of his later work in television, after a long absence, on such series as KTLA's Paramount Television and Your Funny Funny Films, in the 1960s. Jeff Kisseloff conducted the interview in Marin County, CA on June 23, 2000.

If the information had not come out, the American people would have gone on with their merry lives. They would have had entertainment, then it would have gone on to some other form of entertainment on television. What really took place, was that live television essentially stopped with my demise and the demise of my show. Television then went into the area of filmed product.

Interview Highlights

Embedded thumbnail for Albert Freedman on the head of Geritol (Twenty-One's sponsor) wanting Herbert Stempel off the program and how Freedman convinced Charles Van Doren to become a contestant

Albert Freedman on the head of Geritol (Twenty-One's sponsor) wanting Herbert Stempel off the program and how Freedman convinced Charles Van Doren to become a contestant

Albert Freedman on the head of Geritol (Twenty-One's sponsor) wanting Herbert Stempel off the program and how Freedman convinced Charles Van Doren to become a contestant 07:41
Embedded thumbnail for Albert Freedman on coaching contestants on Twenty-One

Albert Freedman on coaching contestants on Twenty-One

Albert Freedman on coaching contestants on Twenty-One02:56
Embedded thumbnail for Albert Freedman on whether or not he gave Charles Van Doren answers for his first appearance Twenty-One  

Albert Freedman on whether or not he gave Charles Van Doren answers for his first appearance Twenty-One  

Albert Freedman on whether or not he gave Charles Van Doren answers for his first appearance Twenty-One  01:47
Embedded thumbnail for Television Industry

Albert Freedman on Charles Van Doren contacting him when the D.A.'s office announced an investigation into the quiz shows (including Twenty-One)

Television Industry01:22
Embedded thumbnail for Albert Freedman on Robert Redford's movie "Quiz Show" and whether or not the film was accurate

Albert Freedman on Robert Redford's movie "Quiz Show" and whether or not the film was accurate

Albert Freedman on Robert Redford's movie "Quiz Show" and whether or not the film was accurate03:51